Fermentation Fest // Wormfarm Institute in Reedsburg, Wisconsin

Fermentation on Wheels will be at one of the nation’s largest fermentation festivals this year! During food chain hours, everyone is welcome on the bus and all questions are welcome. Taste the ferments, browse the library, and stay for a chat. Fermentation on Wheels also has starter cultures and books for sale.

Tara is offering two workshops at Ferment Fest this year. Both are interactive, intimate, and located on the bus. Spots are limited, so reserve your tickets soon.

10/6 or 10/13 9:15 am // Cultured Breakfast with Fermentation on Wheels
Greet the day with Fermentation on Wheels! Tara will serve her Slab City Specialty — cultured oat date shakes. Tour the bus (its ferments and systems!), delve into all things fermented, and go home with recipe ideas to start every morning with fermentation. Limited to 8 attendees. $35.

10/7 or 10/14 12:15pm // Mid-Day Miso Madness: A Luncheon
A mid-day luncheon with Fermentation on Wheels featuring a creative ways you can wrap miso in everyday foods. Chat with Tara about all things fermented, peruse the library, and go home with a full belly, heart, and head. Limited to 8 attendees. $50

REGISTER

ABOUT FERMENTATION FEST

Fermentation Fest – A Live Culture Convergence is an annual celebration of live culture in all its forms, from dance to yogurt, poetry to sauerkraut. Presented by Reedsburg, WI-based Wormfarm Institute, Fermentation Fest brings together farmers, chefs, artists, poets and performers in the beautiful working lands of Sauk County, WI for tastings, demonstrations, cooking classes, art events, performances, food carts and more.

CLASSES, TASTINGS AND MORE

From sauerkraut to hot sauces, from chocolate to coffee, beer and wine, from yogurt to sourdough bread, over one-third of what we consume is fermented. Fermentation Fest features authors, chefs, bakers, scientists, chocolatiers, brew masters and cheese makers over two consecutive weekends, offering 50 classes and lectures that celebrate the abundance and transformation of fermentation. Learn skills you can use at home, enjoy samples, and experience hands-on ways to bring fermentation into your daily experience.

FARM/ART DTOUR

The biennial feature of Fermentation Fest – where live cultures converge, Farm/ Art DTour is a 50 + mile drive through scenic working farmland of rural Sauk County where artists explore the timeless connection between land and people. For thousands of years farmers in cultures around the world interwove dance, music, and art through rituals of planting and the harvest in celebration of the land and those who care for it. Through a contemporary approach and within this timeless context, we continue the tradition.

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Black Hills Farmers Market // Rapid City, SD

Join Fermentation on Wheels in its bus-turned-fermentation lab, library, and workshop space at Rapid City’s largest Black Hills Farmers Market on September 29th.

Tara, the project’s founder, will share tastes of her creations and offer a basic sauerkraut demonstration for market passerby that highlights the beauties of fermentation in connection to farming, food, and our inner and outer ecosystems.

Fermented foods heal our bodies, celebrate age-old traditions, and promote healthy people and planet. Interested beginners and advanced fermenters alike are welcome to hop on the bus and join the conversation!

Maker:S,Date:2017-11-8,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y

Fermentation on Wheels is a grassroots project that brings fermentation education to communities of all ages and backgrounds and inspires with a school bus that has been converted into a fermentation lab, library, and workshop space. The project’s founder, Tara Whitsitt, organizes events nationwide to bridge communities and restore a genuine fascination in local, traditionally-preserved foods. By traveling the country, connecting consumers to local farmers, and teaching fermentation, she hopes to emphasize the importance of strong, sustainable food practices and values.

Read more on www.fermentationonwheels.com

Wild Vegetable Fermentation // Bozeman, MT– CANCELLED

PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Discover the simple tradition of preservation through bacterial collaboration in one of its most simple forms: via the local micro-fora of vegetables! Fermented foods heal our bodies, celebrate age-old traditions, and promote healthy eco-systems. Learn about cost effective & simple tools that will help you get started at home in this by-donation class.

You are also invited onto the bus for tours, tastings, and fermentation talk. Bring starter cultures of your own for exchange and discussion. If you would like to take a starter culture home with you, please bring something to trade or $10 (per starter culture).

Fermentation Fest, A Live Culture Convergence // Reedsburg, WI

Fermentation Fest – A Live Culture Convergence is an annual celebration of live culture in all its forms, from dance to yogurt, poetry to sauerkraut. Presented by Reedsburg, WI-based Wormfarm Institute, Fermentation Fest brings together farmers, chefs, artists, poets and performers in the beautiful working lands of Sauk County, WI for nine days of tastings, demonstrations, cooking classes, art events, performances, food carts and more.

Check back for more details soon.

Author Talk and Fermentation Workshop // Portland, OR

Fermentation on Wheels –the book and the adventure–was born in Oregon’s Willamette Valley in May 2013 when author Tara Whitsitt converted a forty-foot vintage military bus into a fermentation lab and workshop. Since then, she’s travelled over 24,000 miles with a mission to bridge communities, inspire sustainability, and teach fermentation.

With her new illustrated memoir/cookbook, Tara shares road stories and recipes–from the generous farmers who offered respite and fermentables, to young arms baptized elbow-deep in salty cabbage, and to fifty unique recipes of delectable fermentations learned and created while on the road.

After her book discussion, discover the simple tradition of preservation through bacterial collaboration in one of its most simple forms: via the local micro-flora of vegetables! Fermented foods heal our bodies, celebrate age-old traditions, and promote healthy eco-systems. Learn about the cost effective and simple tools involved and go home knowing how to creatively and fearlessly make sauerkraut, cucumber pickles, and much more with this hands-on demonstration.

Author Talk and Fermentation Workshop // Seattle, WA

Fermentation on Wheels –the book and the adventure–was born in Oregon’s Willamette Valley in May 2013 when author Tara Whitsitt converted a forty-foot vintage military bus into a fermentation lab and workshop. Since then, she’s travelled over 24,000 miles with a mission to bridge communities, inspire sustainability, and teach fermentation.

With her new illustrated memoir/cookbook, Tara shares road stories and recipes–from the generous farmers who offered respite and fermentables, to young arms baptized elbow-deep in salty cabbage, and to fifty unique recipes of delectable fermentations learned and created while on the road.

After her book discussion, discover the simple tradition of preservation through bacterial collaboration in one of its most simple forms: via the local micro-flora of vegetables! Fermented foods heal our bodies, celebrate age-old traditions, and promote healthy eco-systems. Learn about the cost effective and simple tools involved and go home knowing how to creatively and fearlessly make sauerkraut, cucumber pickles, and much more with this hands-on demonstration.

Get Cultured! with Fermentation on Wheels // Eugene, OR

Celebrate the wonderful world of fermentation with Tara Whitsitt of Fermentation on Wheels. From noon to 2:00, Tara will guide you through a variety of cultures that require inoculation—their history, how to feed them, and the transformative foods they create such as kefir, tibicos, sourdough, and kombucha. Then, from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m., Tara will open the Fermentation on Wheels bus for tours and a culture swap. Bring your own starter cultures for exchange & discussion as well as an empty jar and take a culture home from the workshop. If you would like to take a starter culture home with you, please bring something to trade or $10 (per starter culture).

Fermentation on Wheels in Del Norte! // Crescent City, CA

Fermentation on Wheels will join the Health Fair at the Del Norte County Fairgrounds on Saturday, June 3rd, sharing the joys of fermentation with a sauerkraut demo at 11:30am as well as starter culture swap* and more food fermentation education throughout the day. What does that mean? After you get your veggies, fruits, and grains at the farmers market, swing by the bus and learn how to ferment them!

*Attendees may bring starter cultures of their own for exchange & discussion as well as bring an empty jar and take a culture home from the workshop. If you would like to take a starter culture home with you, please bring something to trade or $10 (per starter culture).

Fermentation on Wheels is a grassroots project that brings fermentation education to communities of all ages and backgrounds and inspires with a school bus that has been converted into a fermentation lab, library, and workshop space. The project’s founder, Tara Whitsitt, organizes events nationwide to bridge communities and restore a genuine fascination in local, traditionally-preserved foods. By traveling the country, connecting consumers to local farmers, and teaching fermentation, she hopes to emphasize the importance of strong, sustainable food practices and values.

Sauerkraut with Dandelion Greens, Turmeric, and Spice

I’ve been loving sauerkraut made with bitter greens and turmeric this fall and winter. Turmeric has natural anti-inflammatory compounds, increases the anti-oxidant capacity of the body, and helps prevent heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s. With all its benefits, turmeric is such a powerful medicine that I try to get a healthy dose of it, especially during sick season. The bioavailability of its nutrients is increased during fermentation, so I choose to simply add it into my bi-monthly sauerkraut routine.

Bitter or winter greens, such as dandelion, kale, arugula, beet greens, and spinach, act as gentle diuretics, purifying blood and cleansing the system, and are also great for digestion. Integrate bitter greens into sauerkraut to get the health benefits without getting slammed by the bitterness. Dandelion greens are my favorite.

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Yields 1 gallon, 1–4 weeks

Ingredients

7 lbs cabbage (2 medium-size heads)

6 to 8 dandelion leaves

3 inches turmeric root

1 tsp Szechuan pepper

2 scotch bonnet peppers (or other hot pepper available to you)

2–3 tbsp salt

Materials

1-gallon glass jar or crock

Weight and cover

Process

1) Cut cabbage into quarters and finely chop. Place chopped cabbage into a large bowl. If you have outer leaves of cabbage, rather than compost them, place them aside for later.

2) Finely chop dandelion greens and add them to the bowl with the cabbage.

3) Add 2 tbsp of salt and massage the cabbage for 5 to 10 minutes. Your cabbage will release water, which will serve as the sauerkraut’s brine. Taste the cabbage—you may want to add more salt to your liking.

4) Check for a puddle at the bottom of your bowl and squeeze a handful of cabbage above the bowl to check whether it has produced enough brine. Once gently squeezed, brine should drip with ease from the cabbage.

5) Finely chop the turmeric and scotch bonnet peppers and add them with the Szechuan pepper to your bowl of salty cabbage and dandelion greens. Distribute with caution — the heat of the pepper might irritate your hands and the turmeric will stain your hands (temporarily). I recommend tossing with salad servers.

6) Once the ingredients are distributed, pack the cabbage into your gallon jar until it’s submerged below brine. Take the cabbage leaves you set aside from earlier and layer them on top of your kraut, pressing down.

7) Add a weight, such as scrubbed and boiled river rocks or a small jar filled with water, on top of the layer of cabbage leaves. Secure a tea towel to the mouth of your jar with a rubber band to keep dust and bugs out.

8) Wait a week and taste—you may want to keep it going another week, but it’s good practice to try your ferments along their journey. Vegetables will ferment at different speeds depending on their environment—the warmer it is, the faster it will ferment, while the colder it is, the slower it will ferment. Most vegetable ferments thrive best between 68° to 76° F.

9) When the sauerkraut is to your liking, cover it with a lid and store in the fridge. You may also pack it into smaller jars if that’s easier. Keeping your new kraut cool slows fermentation, so you can enjoy the fermented flavor from when you sealed the jar.

 

Beet Kvass

Beet kvass is known for its nourishing qualities, especially as a stomach tonic. Beets are powerhouses packed with vitamins, such as folate, that are enhanced when fermented. There are many ways to culture beet juice and produce this lively beverage – I like to ferment mine with a combination of wild bacteria, of the beet but also from brines of other cultured vegetables.

Traditionally, in 10th century Eastern Europe, kvass was fermented from the yeast of stale black or rye bread. Today it’s common to follow this traditional ingredient with the addition of whey.

I don’t use bread or whey. With this recipe, you get the full flavor profile of the beet, and the bacteria therein. As I always recommend, use quality ingredients: the quality of the ingredient increases the quality of the culture. We rely on the quality of the bacteria that’s carried in our vegetables to bring us tasty flavors.

Yields 1 gallon, 3-4 weeks

Ingredients

3 quarts water

6 large beets

2 tablespoons salt

¼ cup cultured brine (sauerkraut juice)

Materials

Gallon glass jar

Tea towel

Rubberband

1) Dissolve 2 tablespoons of salt in 2 quarts of water. This serves as the brine for your kvass – I prefer less salt with my kvass. You can double the salt content if you prefer a saltier version. Save your last quart of water to fill your fermentation vessel.

NOTE: I like to use filtered or spring water, but you can use tap water, too. I like to keep a few gallons of tap water out in the open, allowing the chlorine to evaporate out over the course of a few nights.

2) Cut your 6 large beets into quarters and place in the glass gallon jar. The jar should be close to ¾ full.

3) Pour your recently made brine into the glass gallon jar, covering the beets. Add more water to completely submerge the beets and fill the jar. If filling the jar requires more than one quart of water, add more than one quart.

4) Cover the jar with a clean tea towel and secure with a rubber band. Beets are sweet and can attract unwanted bugs, so secure well.

5) Let the beets and brine sit for 2-3 weeks. I let mine sit for a full 3 weeks, to get the most out of the beets.

6) After 3 weeks, strain the beets from the brine into a clean gallon jar and add your ¼ cup of cultured brine. A cultured brine is any brine saved from a leftover fermented vegetables. This could even be the leftover brine from kimchi. I like to use sauerkraut brine from an especially well received sauerkraut. I find this introduces an especially nice touch to beet kvass, and boosts the fermentation process.

7) One week later: bottle and store in a cool place. The kvass is rich in flavor and best in small amounts — like a tonic. If you prefer an effervescent beverage (as I do), store in a sling top bottle at room temperature for a few days before storing in a cool place.